We are opening our own 100% vegan restaurant! ...April fools!

We are opening our own 100% vegan restaurant! ...April fools!

For the past few years we have been building up a vegan guide to all of Norway's best vegan friendly restaurants. Many new vegans open our app and are surprised to be able to find a world of different tastes and cuisines that they didn't think they would be able to experience ever again after adopting a vegan lifestyle. Vegan burgers, pizzas, cheesecake and hot dogs are now populating the menus of over 500 places in Norway, and whilst we think that it is amazing that vegans can easily get to experience the same culinary delights as everyone else, we do see a gap in the market...

Your first three weeks as a vegan

Your first three weeks as a vegan

Thinking of trying out veganism? We know that it might seem like a massive scary change at first, but it gets easy really fast, and in fact by the time you get to your third week as a vegan you will probably find that the lifestyle feels mostly effortless to continue. It's a bit difficult to know how exactly to start with going vegan so we thought we would write a guide to help make those first few weeks of trying out veganism in Norway so much easier. At the end of the three weeks you might not know all the little tips and things that someone who has been vegan for many years does but you will definitely be over the hardest part and know more than enough to stay vegan if that's what you want.

The man in the fur hat

The man in the fur hat

I won't be ignorant to the violence of animals, I will make sure I stay educated and informed on the way they are treated. I simply don't want to live in a world where we shrug and ignore the terrible things that are happening to others because it doesn't affect us personally. I want to live a life filled with kindness, compassion and empathy and that is why I will be marching with NOAH at their Fakkeltog mot Pels this year and every year until all cages are empty.

Vegan Norway launches in Stavanger for World Vegan Day 2016

Vegan Norway launches in Stavanger for World Vegan Day 2016

Happy World Vegan Day everyone! Each year we try to do something special on this day and this year we have done it again. We are proud to announce that the Vegan Norway app has been updated on both iOS and Android and now covers a fourth city: the beautiful and charming Stavanger!

Vegan Brands sold at KICKS

Vegan Brands sold at KICKS

Here at Vegan Norway we understand that trying to find vegan friendly skincare and makeup products can feel a little bit scary so we want to make an extra effort to find great places to add to our app which sell animal cruelty free products which are free of animal derived ingredients.

KICKS are a well known chain of beauty stores in Norway they sell many scandinavian and international brands of makeup, beauty accessories and skincare. I realised that it would be super helpful for vegans to be able to shop there so I spent a whole day going through their list of brands that they sell to find out what is and is not vegan and created a guide.

A 'real' vegan part 3: You are enough.

A 'real' vegan part 3: You are enough.

When we think of the horrible ways that humans treat the wonderful animals that we share the earth with, choosing to eat a felafel burger instead of steak can feel like a minuscule contribution to their liberation. However we have to remember that in a world where selfishness is rewarded and kindness is mocked as a weakness, all victories for animals are valuable.

A 'real' vegan part 2 : Clarity for consumers

A 'real' vegan part 2 : Clarity for consumers

There needs to be a clear set of rules to define the vegan label for consumer purposes and these rules should reflect what is mainly accepted as the definition of veganism no matter what our personal ethics are. This helps businesses understand how to use the vegan label on their products, and brings a level of consistency to a topic which is already confusing and scary to the average person. 

If we are aware of how our personal ethics (or example only eating fair trade or refusing to consume palm oil) differ from the accepted definition of veganism we make it so much easier for other people to become vegan. Whilst curating the Vegan Norway app I have come across many examples of bad vegan labelling. A restaurant will meet someone who calls themselves vegan but eats fish and so will create a dish on their menu which includes fish sauce, a vegan burger will be served which comes covered in dairy based dressing, or a cafe will proudly proclaim that they sell vegan skillingsboller... which are secretly painted with egg. It is unacceptable for a business to advertise a product as vegan when they are unfamiliar with the meaning of the word, after all it only takes a few minutes to do a quick google search and find out. It calls the trustworthiness of their whole business into consideration, and shows a disregard of respect for the needs of their customers ethics and allergies. 

A 'real' vegan part 1: Defining veganism and exploring its grey areas.

A 'real' vegan part 1: Defining veganism and exploring its grey areas.

Cutting out the use of animals for food, entertainment and clothing seems absolutely daunting at first but in a short amount of time we find that we become pros at cooking without cheese, milk, meat and fish and are able to scan ingredients lists in supermarkets faster than Usain Bolt running for the night bus home. Dropping dairy, eggs and meat from your diet and maybe switching your running shoes to ones made from synthetic material will make a significant and wonderful difference in reducing the amount of animals used for agriculture and other industries and we are so grateful to everyone who does that, but what about the other perhaps less obvious ways that animals are used in our lives?

Don't forget the B12

Don't forget the B12

Vitamin B12 is required for the proper function and development of the brain, nerves, blood cells, and many other parts of the body. The only natural places it can be found in good enough quantities are foods such as meat, fish, and dairy products, that's why vegans and vegetarians must take it as a supplement.

B12 helps your body in so many ways so please put some time aside in your morning routine to down your pill with your morning coffee, orange juice and toast.

Who are vegans and how many are there? Some notes on surveys and representation.

Who are vegans and how many are there? Some notes on surveys and representation.

Some noise has been made recently about the results of a survey conducted in the UK to determine how many residents of the country identify as vegans. According to the much publicised conclusions, there are now roughly half a million vegans  the UK, around 1% of the population, up from 350,000 ten years ago. Vegans and animal rights advocates may look upon these numbers with delight, but whenever presented with numbers, its good and healthy to ask some questions about it, rather than taking it all at face value. We have seen some people get a bit confused with the results, so we thought we would explain a bit of the methods behind surveying, and hopefully help make sense of what is being widely heralded as proof of the inexorable rise of veganism.

Coping as a rape survivor in the animal advocacy movement

Coping as a rape survivor in the animal advocacy movement

Whether you think that human oppression is the same as animal oppression is frankly not the point. The point actually is that it is an inappropriate, emotionally manipulative and crass conversation to have in the first place. We are fighting for animals as a proxy with the goal to reduce and one day stop the oppression of animals. To get the most people to stop oppressing animals as possible it makes sense to appeal to humans in a kind, informative and thoughtful way. In our fight for liberation we need the balanced voices of everyone, not just the people who are privileged enough to not know what oppression feels like.

Comparing animal oppression to rape and other human traumas overwhelmingly puts more people off then it does inspire people as the only people who seem to enjoy and be inspired by these discussions are people who are already vegan. I don't want the vegan movement to be like this. I want it be a space where rape isn'nt turned into a meme, I want my jewish friends to be able to ask where they can get the best tofu in the city on a vegan group without having to scroll past a photo of the holocaust. I want my black friends to feel welcome in animal advocacy communities without having to talk to people about lynching as if racism is something that is  'already solved' and above all, I want to put my energy into helping animals instead of having to take time off to deal with the trauma I am incurring.

Trondheim Vegan Fair

Trondheim Vegan Fair

Trondheim is a city I have always wanted to visit. It's the capital of the north of Norway and home to the awesome Nidaros cathedral, amazing jazz festivals, the wharves, and charming Bakklandet. Trondheim is full of students, technology, cycling, music and food. This makes it a super vibrant city, and exploring it as a vegan is way easier than you might expect. From pizza restaurants (yes with vegan cheese on the pizzas) to sushi places to 100% vegan cafes, Trondheim has everything my little vegan heart could possibly want.

I was over the moon when I was asked to come to Trondheim to hold a talk at Trondheim Vegan Fair by Emma Jarvis, the festivals organiser. It's an annual event which attracts a lot of people. As well as a bunch of interesting stalls they also have talks, workshops, a fashion show, various cooking courses, a cinema zone and loads of activities for children. It caters to everyone basically! 

Nick's top 5 Oslo shopping destinations

Nick's top 5 Oslo shopping destinations

Oslo isn't just great for dining out as a vegan, there are a lot of great shops which make the city fun and exciting too. From fresh fruit to face masks, from chia seeds to chewy sweets, Oslo has a lot to offer. Here are some of my favourite places in the city to shop.

I am only one

I am only one

My name is Sally. I am a 28 year old foreign woman living in Norway. I consider myself to be an activist, but when I tell people this they often look at me either with fear, disdain, mockery or disbelief. Some people might say that I don't look like an activist, or that I don't act like one. Some people say 'you're actually alright for a vegan'. Some people think that 'activist' is bad word that should be reserved for trouble causers, violent protesters or daring individuals that risk their life for the sake of the greater good. Some people think that activists lack education, intelligence or are 'crazy', but this is usually a way that people put others down so that they don't have to take the issues they are talking about seriously. Maybe you don't consider yourself an activist because you think it sounds way too extreme and unfriendly. 

The thing is that I'm just a normal person. I've been through some really tough times and some really great times. However, when people find out that I am a vegan or a feminist or an activist, they usually make assumptions about my personality and life which couldn't be further from the truth.

We're not Happy Cow, we're not Trip Advisor and we're not Norsk Vegansamfunn.

We're not Happy Cow, we're not Trip Advisor and we're not Norsk Vegansamfunn.

Whilst some people might look at our site and our app and think that we are a big organisation or a funded project, at the core of Vegan Norway is three normal people, who have day jobs that started a fun project in 2015 that they make no money on. We made an app, the app is our personal guide to cool vegan places. Everything else is just gravy, baby!